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The Guardian Owns Up to Big Mistake 100 Years Later

Here’s an interesting bit of history: 100 years ago tomorrow, Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, thus setting off a chain of events that led to World War I. Well, today The Guardian actually published a story about how their very publication got the implications of that fateful day so very wrong. Call it a correction a hundred years in the making, if you will.

A correspondent for the Manchester Guardian, reacting to the assassination, reported, “It is not to be supposed that the death of the Archduke Francis Ferdinand will have any immediate or salient effect on the politics of Europe.”

That must have felt awkward a month later…

The Guardian also published an editorial reacting to the assassination that only focused on what implications it could have for Austrian politics.

And, of course, mere weeks later England declared war on Germany. And after that declaration, The Guardian wrote this warning: “It will be a war in which we risk almost everything of which we are proud, and in which we stand to gain nothing.”

[h/t Poynter]
[image via The Guardian]

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Follow Josh Feldman on Twitter: @feldmaniac

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