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Which News Anchor Is Leaving Twitter to Pursue a ‘Social-Free Lifestyle’?

Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 11.33.43 AMYesterday, we went over a Breitbart editor being banned from Twitter. That was newsworthy because, well, whether you like it or not, in 2016, a person’s presence on social media is strongly related to their professional life. Reporters, especially, depend on Twitter. Many reporters are mandated by their employers to tweet their own articles. Receiving tips and engaging with consumers are key parts of maintaining an account and, in a way, a career.

What happens when someone isn’t banned from the platform by anyone but themselves? What happens when a public figure elects to leave on their own?

We’ll soon find out because CNBC anchor Kelly Evans has bounced from the microblogging site.

She wrote a piece for her employer detailing her choice. In it, she said that she understood that her decision would have an impact on her professional life and that while “being constantly confronted with gross and bizarre comments from strangers” was a part of what made her leave, so, too, was her habit of replying faster to online comments than messages from her own family members.

She said that she may still reverse her course and return to Twitter, which keeps account information ready for about a year just in case defectors change their minds, but for now, she is enjoying the “social-free lifestyle.”

What do you think? Could you do it?

[image via screengrab]

For more from Lindsey, who is assuredly never deleting her accounts, try Twitter and Facebook.

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