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Megyn Kelly Brings On Former Bush Staffers To Take On Obama’s bin Laden Ad

On Wednesday’s edition of America Live, host Megyn Kelly addressed the debate surrounding President Barack Obama touting his role in the capture and killing of Obama bin Laden as he campaigns for re-election. Kelly noted that, back in 2004, then-President George W. Bush had used imagery from of the Twin Towers wreckage in a campaign ad, prompting an “instant media outcry.”

After offering a few examples, Kelly asked where that outrage is now when it comes to Obama.

Kelly’s guest Dana Perino, whom you’ll recall had served as White House Press Secretary under President Bush, recalled the backlash Bush’s ad had receive, noting that “the War on Terror had been relatively new” at the time and venturing to guess that perhaps this played a part in the outrage it inspired. “Perhaps if I’m being generally more sensitized to the politics of the War on Terror,” she added, “I do think that had President Obama just gone to Afghanistan, given that good speech that he gave last night and not done the ad suggesting that Romney would not have done the same thing, we probably wouldn’t be having this panel today.”

RELATED: Jon Stewart Goes Off On GOP Hypocrisy For Criticizing Obama’s Bin Laden Ad

Former Bush speechwriter Marc Thiessen added that Obama had opened himself up to criticism with this ad, essentially Mitt Romney to point out that if Obama “had been the decider-in-chief” when we’d captured, say, Khalid Sheikh Mohammad, “there would have been no intelligence that would have led us” to bin Laden.

President Bush’s former deputy assistant, Brad Blakeman, shared that his nephew was one of the first responders who lost their lives on 9/11 but that he takes no issue with Bush’s ad. He did, however, take some issue with Obama’s role in finding bin Laden:

Now, let me say this about the killing of Osama bin Laden. Republicans, Democrats, America rejoice in the fact that our President gave that command. And having said that, the American people have to realize where the President was when the attack was going down. He was playing golf at Andrews Air Force Base. He was called back to the White House while the attack was underway, and if you look at the official photo released by the White House — not us releasing the photo, it was the White House’s own photo, a historic photo marking this President’s great act of killing Osama bin Laden — he looks like he’s late to a movie. He’s not sitting in the President’s command and control chair in the Situation Room. A general is sitting in the President’s chair. He’s sitting in his golf clothes, off to the side like he had just come in, which he did, from the golf course. So the fact is this is a matter of leadership. The President wants to make the American people believe he’s John Wayne when he’s really Barney Fife. All his actions that he’s trying to spin have to be taken in the full context of what he did, when he did it and the purposes for which he’s trying to exploit it.

Thiessen later added that one reason the War in Afghanistan has failed to receive support from American is because the President has “not been doing his job as commander-in-chief, which is to report regularly to the American people” where the war is concerned. As such, he thought it a good thing that Obama had gone to Afghanistan, although he believes that, ultimately, the President’s message in his speech there was weak.

Blakeman then said that the President “met with our troops only because he had to. Come on. Between GSA and Solyndra and the Secret Service scandal, unemployment… If it wasn’t for bad news, this Guy wouldn’t have any news at all. He needed to change the subject. That’s what he did. I think if you give a fair reading to his speech, he used our troops for a political speech, for his own political benefit.”

Have a look, via Fox News:

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