GOP Congressman Suggests Republicans Are Nervous People Will Move to Georgia to Vote in Senate Runoffs

 

Georgia Rep. Barry Loudermilk (R) expressed concern Friday that his state’s December deadline for voting in January runoff elections amounts to a “loophole” encouraging people to move to Georgia to vote.

“Some are actually promoting this activity, and some [are] saying, we will rent you a house [or] pay for your apartment if you will move to Georgia, register to vote, and vote in the election for the Democrats,” Loudermilk said in a Friday interview with SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Tonight host Joel Pollak.

By law, Georgians have until December 7 to register to vote in the state’s January 5 runoff elections, which will determine whether incumbent Republican Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue retain their seats, and by extension, whether Republicans retain a majority in the Senate. The party is set to hold as many as 51 of the Senate’s 100 seats if they win both races, or as few as 49 if both candidates are defeated.

In light of the high stakes, some Democrats have encouraged people to take advantage of the late registration. “I hope everybody moves to Georgia, you know, in the next month or two, registers to vote and votes for these two Democratic senators,” New York Times writer Thomas Friedman told CNN in a Monday interview.

At the same time, Georgia’s state constitution holds that any runoff election is to be considered “a continuation” of the previous election — restricted to the same pool of eligible voters — leading to ambiguity around the issue of voter eligibility.

“That means you can’t register to vote between the general election and the runoff election,” Pollak argued. “You have to have been registered before the general.”

“Unfortunately, the law is a little different. And I agree with you,” Loudermilk replied. “I think it’s unconstitutional that someone comes in and moves.”

Under either interpretation, Loudermilk noted, voters who move to the state intending simply to cast a ballot and depart could face legal challenges.

“The problem with the folks who are going to move in here just to vote is that they’re committing a felony, because that is illegal … to move here and qualify to vote without that permanency aspect,” Loudermilk said. “They committed a felony and they will be prosecuted.”

Listen above (the relevant part starts around the 3:45 mark), via SiriusXM.

Have a tip we should know? tips@mediaite.com

Filed Under: