comScore How ‘Obvious Hoax’ Tweet Became Leading Pro-Roy Moore Conspiracy Theory | Mediaite

How ‘Obvious Hoax’ Tweet Became Leading Pro-Roy Moore Conspiracy Theory

If you’ve been following far-right media today, you probably noticed an absurd conspiracy theory involving Roy Moore and those allegations of child sexual abuse. Gateway Pundit picked it up and so did Infowars, among others.

The theory claims that a Washington Post reporter offered a woman $1,000 if she would lie and say that Moore had sexually assaulted her. If this was true, it would absolutely blow the lid off the fake news, with all of their fakey fake sources and fakey fake haircuts.

There’s just one teensy problem. The entire thing seemed to be sourced from just one tweet.

Read it below and see if you can find anything off about it.

First of all, not much by way of actual evidence, right? “A family friend who lives in Alabama” is not exactly Deep Throat. The four question marks, also, do not inspire confidence. That’s not what you were supposed to notice, though.

Check out the monetary amount. Who writes amounts like that? Have you ever put the dollar sign after the amount? Why, it’s positively un-American.

Could the far-right have been duped by a Russian troll in their desperate quest to absolve an alleged child molester?

It’s at least as possible as a Washington Post reporter named “Beth” handing out thousand dollar bills.

The Twitter user who started this whole thing is named “Doug Lewis” and claims to have served in the United States Navy for 22 years. His username is the subtly patriotic “umpire43.” What, “MomAndApplePie43” was taken?

He also has a long history with jumping on ridiculous conspiracy theories, often going to absurd lengths in order to support President Donald Trump.

Washington Post reporter Beth Reinhard is the obvious “Beth” referred to the original tweet. Gotta love how “Doug Lewis” used only her first name, however, thus acting the fool and allowing readers to “figure it out” for themselves. Well played.

“Doug Lewis” also claims that this friend of his wife has a “pic of the woman named Beth” and a taped conversation, though both have mysteriously failed to materialize.

Reinhard has, as expected, become a target for alt-right trolls to flex their digital muscle.

In the meantime, not-at-all fishy super-patriot “Doug Lewis” has bravely soldiered on, continuing to post unfounded conspiracy theories.

And that, boys and girls, is how bullshit is born. Shine on, you crazy diamonds.

[image via screenshot]

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