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‘It’s a Good Situation’: Larry Kudlow Dismisses ‘Second Wave’ of Coronavirus as U.S. Cases Grow

White House National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow dismissed a “second wave” of coronavirus in the United States on CNBC Monday, calling the country’s situation “good” because 37 states have “virtually no problems.”

Last Tuesday, the nation’s top infectious diseases expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, warned that infections are growing at a “greater degree than they had previously seen in certain states, including states in the southwest and in the south.” He also added, “I don’t like to talk about a second wave right now, because we haven’t gotten out of our first wave.”

In his CNBC interview, Kudlow doubled down on comments from June 12 where he said: “There is no emergency, there is no second wave. I don’t know where that got started on Wall Street.”

Kudlow pointed to declining fatality rates and a reopening economy as evidence of the “good situation.”

There have been 2,300,000 cases and 122,000 deaths from Covid-19 in the United States over the last four months. Cases are rising in 26 states, most notably in Florida, Arizona, and Texas, which are seeing over 2,000 new cases each day.

“The positivity rate is still low, well under 10 percent,” Kudlow said. “The numbers quoted to me by the health people — I’m not the expert, they are — over the weekend, there are 37 states that have virtually no problems. There are 13 states that do have hotspots. By the way, part of that is massive new testing.”

Kudlow pointed out Arizona, Florida, North Carolina and Nevada as hotspots, but said decreases in Illinois, Washington D.C., and Michigan are “really something.”

“It’s come a long way since last winter,” Kudlow continued. “There is no second wave coming it’s just hotspots. They send in CDC teams, we’ve got the testing procedures, we’ve got the diagnostics, we’ve got the PPE, so I really think it’s a good situation.”

In February, Kudlow infamously claimed the coronavirus was “contained” — a comment he now says was inaccurate.

Watch above, via CNBC.

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